VBI Vaccines Inc. (NASDAQ: VBIV) (VBI), a commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company developing next-generation infectious disease and immuno-oncology vaccines, today announced that the Company’s abstract titled, “Interim Results of the Extension Phase of a Phase I/IIa Trial of a Therapeutic CMV Vaccine Against Recurrent Glioblastoma (GBM)” was accepted for poster presentation at the 24th Annual Scientific Meeting and Education Day of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO), taking place November 20-24, 2019 in Phoenix, Arizona.

The ongoing Phase 1/2a study is a multi-center, open-label study of VBI-1901, VBI’s cancer vaccine immunotherapeutic candidate, in patients with recurrent GBM. Where Part A of the study was a dose-escalation phase to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and to define the optimal therapeutic dose level of VBI-1901, Part B of the study is a subsequent extension phase with narrower enrollment criteria, designed to explore initial potential efficacy signals. Download Poster PDFAdditional information, including a detailed description of the study design, eligibility criteria, and investigator sites, is available at ClinicalTrials.gov using identifier NCT03382977.

Poster Presentation/Session Details
  • Title: Interim Results of the Extension Phase of a Phase I/IIa Trial of a Therapeutic CMV Vaccine Against Recurrent Glioblastoma (GBM)
  • Abstract: ATIM-26
  • Date: Friday, November 22, 2019
  • Time: 7:30PM – 9:30PM MST
  • Location: Marriott Desert Ridge Hotel, Ballroom Lawn
About VBI-1901 and GBM

VBI-1901 is a novel cancer vaccine immunotherapeutic candidate developed using VBI’s enveloped virus-like particle (eVLP) technology to target two highly immunogenic cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigens, gB and pp65. Scientific literature suggests CMV infection is prevalent in multiple solid tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). GBM is among the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumors in humans. In the U.S. alone, 12,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. The current standard of care for treating GBM is surgical resection, followed by radiation and chemotherapy. Even with aggressive treatment, GBM progresses rapidly and is exceptionally lethal.